Archive for the ‘Lamentations 3:22-33’ Category

Sunday, July 1st, 2018

Pentecost 6B
July 1, 2018
Rev. Brian Henderson-Pastor of
Trinity Lutheran Church,
7210 Lisbon Street
San Diego, CA 92114

Click here for audio of this message

“The Lord is good to those who wait for Him, to the soul who seeks Him.” [Lamentations 3:25]

Waiting is always difficult.  We always want to find a way to eliminate it, or at least speed it up.  This is especially true when we’re waiting on God to act, speak, or intervene.  May I be so bold as to say that “we” all can become impatient with God?  Could it be true, that in the middle of our waiting we may even feel like God has abandoned us, and forced us to fend for ourselves?

The Apostle Paul knew that temptation to grumble about God’s perceived tardiness, which is why he wrote these Words to encourage the church in Corinth: “We are hard pressed on every side, but not crushed; perplexed but not in despair; persecuted, but not abandoned; struck down, but not destroyed” (2 Corinthians 4:8, 9).

People in general hate to wait, but in their waiting, God’s children find His love.

This was also God’s Word to His people of faith that were conquered and uprooted from their homeland.  They were stripped of every material possession they had.  They lost their homes, possessions, and for some even their families.  To these poor souls, it seemed that they couldn’t fall any lower.  They had nothing left but ruin.  The whole world had written them off.  But the unbelieving world did not know that they had one last and best resource left, and in truth it was their first and only true resource… they had the LORD!

Because of God’s great love for His children of faith, because of His great faithfulness, God’s people would survive; God would protect them and restore them.  His love for His children of faith always wins out.  Even when His children lose faith while they’re waiting, God is faithful and His love never fails!

God can’t help Himself; He always helps His children who He has loved with an everlasting love.  It was His love that moved His compassion to help his children back then, and it is His love that moves His compassion to help us and His church today.  And when we remember God’s love for us, our faith and resolve as individuals and as a congregation are strengthened.  

It is this remembering of His love and faithfulness that moves us to seek out Jesus and rest in His Word and promises.  

In or gospel reading both Jairus and the woman with the issue of blood would have quickly testified that they too felt hard pressed, crushed, and perplexed!  

They must have both been wondering, “Why is this happening to me?”  Why is God allowing my little daughter to die so young?  Why has God allowed me to have this bleeding disease for so long and even blinded the eyes of the doctors so that they can’t cure me?

Jairus must have felt that all of his waiting for his daughter to be healed was for nothing.  Maybe he even felt betrayed by God.  After all he was the faithful leader of God’s people who gathered at the synagogue to hear God’s Word.  Jairus loved God’s children of faith with the love that the Father gave him to love with, so why wasn’t God responding with help for his daughter?

The woman with the issue of blood also must have felt abandoned in her long wait for God’s cure.  Can you imagine, she waited twelve long years and went to doctor after doctor and no comfort or help was found in any of them?  She was now most likely at the point of poverty, and still no cure or even a Word of promise and hope from God! 

Maybe you know exactly how they were feeling.  Maybe you are going through that waiting period right now?  I know that we are as a congregation; we’ve been waiting for so many years for God to send help to we His children of faith who gather here at Trinity Lutheran Church in San Diego.  Like the leader Jairus, we too have been faithful in our ministry of God’s Word and Sacraments.  We have been around since 1894, faithfully dispensing God’s law and gospel, baptizing and feeding His saints.  Why we can even look back into the history of our congregation and see that at one time we were even directly responsible for planting several church’s here in San Diego.  We’ve been intentional in making our congregation multi-cultural and inclusive.  And here we sit; the pews seem empty, our finances are nearly exhausted, and our hope for a future sometimes seems lost.  It seems we’ve tried everything reasonable that should bring growth, but still we struggle.  What more can we do?

Well I’ll tell you what more we can do, both for our own lives and for the life of this congregation; we can find Jesus and go directly to Him!

Finding Jesus was  what both Jairus and the woman did in our gospel lesson.  

Jairus, a man of prestige, a leader of God’s people threw himself down in the dirt at Jesus feet, and simply worshiped Him and called out for help.  “Kyrie!  Lord have mercy!”  The woman with the issue of blood didn’t think she was even worthy of speaking to Jesus.  She felt that her bleeding made her an unclean sinner who shouldn’t even be out in public, yet she went out didn’t she?  She went out and found Jesus, and using the crowd of people to hide in, she got down on her hands and knees and simply reached out with her hand of faith to just touch the corner of Jesus garment.

And what was Jesus response to both of them.  “Do not fear, only believe. Your faith has made you well, made you whole.”  So what can we learn from all of this?  First, Jesus sees and knows all that is happening to you and to our congregation.  He hasn’t turned a blind eye to you or our problems.  Just as he knew how Jairus felt when they told him that his daughter was dead, He knows how we are feeling.  He knows our fears and our feelings of abandonment.  And so Jesus speaks the gospel, words of faith to Jairus and to us.  “Don’t be afraid.  Keep on believing.” 

And to the woman with the issue of blood, Jesus called her out of hiding and insisted that she reveal herself in public.  When He did this, He was also revealing Himself to her; Jesus said,  “Your faith has made you well.  You are no longer a despised unclean sinner.  You are forgiven.  Your faith in me is what has saved you.  You reached out that empty hand of faith and I filled it with even more gifts.  

This morning Jesus is telling us to keep on believing and reaching out and I will keep on filling you!

This was Paul’s message to the church in Corinth as well.  

They too, like Trinity were struggling within their poverty.  Their offerings had all but dried up so that to some it may have appeared that the work of God through the proclaimed Word of God might be dying along with their unpaid bills and salaries.  But Paul wanted to remind them that their true debt was a spiritual one, and that debt had been paid in full by their Savior, the Son of God Jesus Christ.

Paul then directed their minds to a sister congregation in Macedonia.  They too had been stripped of most of their material wealth.  They too saw the tithes and offerings fall to almost useless proportions.  But still they gave.  They gave and gave to the point that Paul thought that it may be unhealthy for them to give anymore, so he asked them to stop.  But they begged Paul to let them keep giving.  Why?  Because they saw the truth in their giving; they were giving out of grace.  They were giving because it was the love of the Father, the gift of grace through faith in His Son Jesus Christ, and the power of the Holy Spirit that was working in them to give.  They knew by faith that they could not out give God, so in essence they were afraid that if they quit giving God would no longer shower them with blessings.  What blessings?  Well I’m sure they were reaping all kinds of physical blessings; how else could they keep on giving?  But the true blessing to them was first the blessing of being forgiven and then the blessing of being part of the believing body of Jesus Christ; the blessings of being Christ’s church, with Jesus as both their head and heart.  And so they gave out of their poverty so that others could be helped and the preaching of the gospel maintained.

And that dear friends was Paul’s solution to the Corinthians lack of charity.  It wasn’t a command to give more or to even give at all; Paul didn’t say give until it hurts so that God will love you more and bless you.  No, Paul simply showed the Corinthians what happens when one heart and many hearts remember and celebrate the faithfulness of God as demonstrated by the coming and giving of His Son.  

Turn your eyes to Jesus, the author and perfecter of your faith.  Remember His suffering and death for you.  Please say it in your heart now, “Jesus gave His life for me, for me, for me.” … let those words echo in your ears.  He became poor so that you could become rich.  He became weak so that you could become strong; strong in faith and strong in service.

How do we celebrate God’s faithfulness?  By turning our eyes of faith to Jesus.  We celebrate by opening our hands and hearts like Jairus and the woman with the issue of blood.  We wait on the LORD quietly to give and take as He sees fit.  We remember that God cannot fill a closed fist, but He can fill hands that are open and lifted high in prayer, giving freely and waiting to receive the abundant blessings from above.

As I walk now to the altar of God to lead us in prayer, please bow your heads open your hands and heart and pray with me…

 

Celebrate His Faithfulness!

Sunday, July 1st, 2012

Fifth Sunday in Pentecost B, July 1, 2012
Pastor Brian Henderson-Trinity Lutheran Church, San Diego, CA
Click here for audio of this message

“The Lord is good to those who wait for Him, to the soul who seeks Him.” [Lamentations 3:25]

Waiting is always difficult.  We always want to find a way to eliminate it, or at least speed it up.  This is especially true when we’re waiting on  God to act, speak, or intervene.  May I be so bold as to say that “we” all can become impatient with God?  Could it be true, that in the middle  of our waiting we may even feel like God has abandoned us, and forced us to fend for ourselves?

The Apostle Paul knew that temptation to grumble about God’s perceived tardiness, which is why he wrote these Words to encourage the  church in Corinth: “We are hard pressed on every side, but not crushed; perplexed but not in despair; persecuted, but not abandoned; struck  down, but not destroyed” (2 Corinthians 4:8,9).

This was also God’s Word in our Old Testament Lesson (Lamentations 3:22-33) to His people of faith that were conquered and uprooted from their homeland.  They were stripped of every  material possession they had.  They lost their homes, possessions, and for some even their families.  To these poor souls, it seemed that they  could fall no lower.  They had no visible resources, either from within or without.  The whole world had declared them a lost nation.  But the unbelieving world did not know that they had one hidden and best resource left, and in truth it was their first and only true resource… they had the LORD!

Because of God’s great love for His children of faith, because of His great faithfulness, God’s people would survive; God would protect them and restore them.  His love for His children of faith always wins out.  Even when His children lose faith while they’re waiting, God is faithful and His love never fails!

God can’t help Himself; He always helps His children who He has loved with an everlasting love.  It was His love that fired His compassion to help his children back then, and it is His love that fires His compassion to help us and His church today.  And when we remember God’s love for us, our faith and resolve as a congregation and as His individual children are strengthened.  It is this remembering of His love and faithfulness that moves us to seek out Jesus and rest in His Word and promises.  It is this remembering that moves us to celebrate God’s faithfulness even when we are hard pressed, crushed, and perplexed!

In or gospel reading (Mark 5:21-43)  both Jairus and the woman with the issue of blood would have quickly testified that they too were hard pressed, crushed, and perplexed!  They must have both been wondering, “Why is this happening to me?”  Why is God allowing my little daughter to die so young?  Why has good allowed me to have this bleeding disease for so long and even blinded the eyes of the doctors so that they can’t cure me?

Jairus must have felt that all of his waiting for his daughter to be healed was for nothing.  Maybe he even felt betrayed by God.  After all he was the faithful leader of God’s people who gathered at the synagogue to hear God’s Word.  Jairus loved God’s children of faith with the love that the Father gave him to love with, so why wasn’t God responding with help?

The woman with the issue of blood also must have felt abandoned in her long wait for God’s cure.  Can you imagine, she waited twelve long years and went to physician after physician and no comfort or help was found?  She was now at the point of poverty, maybe even homelessness in her waiting, and still no cure or even a Word of promise and hope from God!

Maybe you know exactly how they were feeling.  Maybe you are going through that waiting period right now?  I know that we are as a congregation; we are waiting for God to send help to his children of faith who gather at Trinity Lutheran Church in San Diego.  Like the leader Jairus, we to have been faithful in our ministry of God’s Word and Sacrament.  We have been around since 1894, faithfully dispensing God’s law and gospel, baptizing and feeding His saints.  Why we can look back in the history of our congregation and see that at one time we were even directly responsible for planting several church’s here in San Diego.  We’ve been intentional in making our congregation multi-cultural and inclusive.  And here we sit; finances exhausted and our patience about at its end.  Why some of us are even talking about giving up and closing the doors!  I’ve heard it said several times, “Eventually we will just have to give everything to the Synod.  What else can we do?”

Well I’ll tell you what else we can do, both for our own lives and for the life of this congregation; we can find Jesus and go directly to Him!

That’s what both Jairus and the woman did in our gospel lesson.  Jairus, a man of prestige, a leader of God’s people threw himself down in the dirt at Jesus feet, and simply worshiped Him and called out for help.  “Kyrie!  Lord have mercy!”  The woman with the issue of blood did not even consider herself worthy of speaking to Jesus.  She felt that her bleeding made her an unclean sinner who shouldn’t even be out in public, yet she went out didn’t she?  She went out and found Jesus, and using the crowd of people to hide in, she got down on her hands and knees and simply reached out with her hand of faith to just touch the corner of Jesus garment.

And what was Jesus response to both of them.  “Do not fear, only believe. Your faith has made you well, made you whole.”  So what can we learn from all of this?  First, Jesus sees and knows all that is happening to you and to our congregation.  He hasn’t turned a blind eye to you or our problems.  Just as he knew how Jairus felt when they told him that his daughter was dead, He knows how we are feeling.  He knows our fears and our feelings of abandonment.  And so Jesus speaks the gospel, words of faith to Jairus and to us.  “Don’t be afraid.  Keep on believing.”

And to the woman with the issue of blood, Jesus called her out of hiding and insisted that she reveal herself in public.  When He did this, He was also revealing Himself to her; Jesus said,  “Your faith has made you well.  You are no longer a despised unclean sinner.  You are forgiven.  Your faith in me is what has saved you.  You reached out that empty hand of faith and I filled it with even more gifts.  Keep on believing and reaching out and I will keep on filling you!

This was Paul’s message to the church in Corinth (2 Corinthians 8:1-15).  They too, like Trinity were struggling within their poverty.  Their offerings had all but dried up so that to some it may appear that the work of God through the proclaimed Word of God might be dying along with their unpaid bills and salaries.  But Paul wanted to remind them that their true debt was a spiritual one.  And it had been paid in full by their Savior, the Son of God Jesus Christ.

Paul then directed their minds to a sister congregation in Macedonia.  They too had been stripped of most of their material wealth.  They too saw the tithes and offerings fall to almost useless proportions.  But still they gave.  They gave and gave to the point that Paul thought that it may be unhealthy for them to give anymore, so he asked them to stop.  But they begged Paul to let them continue giving.  Why?  Because they saw the truth in their giving; they were giving out of grace.  They were giving because it was the love of the Father, the gift of grace through faith in the Son Jesus Christ, and the power of the Holy Spirit that was working in them to give.  They knew by faith that they could not out give God, so in essence they were afraid that if they quit giving God would no longer shower them with blessings.  What blessings?  Well I’m sure they were reaping all kinds of physical blessings; how else could they keep on giving?  But the true blessing to them was first the blessing of being forgiven and then the blessing of being part of the believing body of Jesus Christ; the blessings of being Christ’s church, with Jesus as both their head and heart.  And so they gave out of their poverty so that others could be helped and the preaching of the gospel maintained.

And that dear friends was Paul’s solution to the Corinthians lack of charity.  It wasn’t a command to give more or to even give at all; Paul didn’t say give until it hurts so that God will love you more and bless you.  No, Paul simply showed the Corinthians what happens when one heart and many hearts remember and celebrate the faithfulness of God as demonstrated by the coming and giving of His Son.

Turn your eyes to Jesus, the author and perfecter of your faith.  Remember His suffering and death for you.  For you, for you, for you… let those words echo in your ears.  He became poor so that you could become rich.  He became weak so that you could become strong; strong in faith and strong in service.

How do we celebrate God’s faithfulness?  By turning our eyes of faith to Jesus.  We celebrate by opening our hands and hearts like Jairus and the woman with the issue of blood.  We wait on the LORD quietly to give and take as He sees fit.  We remember that God cannot fill a closed fist, but He can fill hands that are open and lifted high in prayer, giving freely and waiting to receive the abundant blessings from above.

May the Spirit of Christ move us to do this very thing… I ask this in Jesus name… AMEN!