Archive for the ‘James 5:1-12’ Category

Be Patient

Sunday, September 27th, 2015

18th Sunday after Pentecost, September 27, 2015
Rev. Brian Henderson-Pastor, Trinity Lutheran Evangelical Church,
7210 Lisbon Street, San Diego, CA 92114
http://www.tlcsd.org

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“You also, be patient. Establish your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is at hand.” [James 5:8]

Would you agree with me that waiting can be a hard thing to do?  Would you also agree with me that sometimes being asked to wait with patience can seem unbearable?  Patience is something that is not natural to us, and that is because it is a quality of God, which He demonstrates as He deals with sinful men and women who deserve His anger and punishment, yet He waits patiently for us to turn to Him.  So patience, is a quality that by nature is foreign to us.  But it’s a quality that God gladly gives to us the baptized, if we will simply receive it and live it out.

What does living out that patience mean to we who are now Christians, who walk by faith and live out our baptism?  Well patience is essentially the life of a thankful sinner who has been redeemed by Christ’s cross and recreated in baptism and sustained by God’s Word and Sacrament until…  Until what?  Until Christ’s second coming.  And when will that be?  We don’t know, but what we do know is that God has deferred that Second coming of Christ, the time when He will judge the living and the dead so that as many who desire will be saved.  Why?  Because God is patient, and He does not desire that any should perish, but be saved.  So we wait like God… Patiently.  What does that look like?

A Christian teacher had just finished putting the last pair of rain boots on her first-graders—thirty-two pairs in all. The last little girl said, “You know what, teacher? These aren’t my rain boots.”  The teacher removed them from the girl’s feet. Then the little girl continued, “They are my sister’s, and she let me wear them.” The teacher quietly put them back on her pupil.  Patience, unnoticed by the world yet celebrated in heaven.

A famous teacher of the early church named Chrysostom once said that a patient man is one who although he has the resources and opportunity to avenge himself, chooses to refrain from carrying out vengeance and waits for God.

In our Epistle lesson this morning (James 5:1-12) that is precisely what James is encouraging us to do, wait.  But like we said earlier waiting is hard, but waiting patiently is almost unbearable, especially when we see the world outside of Christ not waiting but taking all they can, even at the expense of others.

This morning, through James God is warning us not to worry about those who live for worldly glory and fame. He is telling us not to envy them or copy their ways because their time of judgment is coming, and it wont be pretty.  Listen: “Come now, you rich, weep and howl for the miseries that are coming upon you. Your riches have rotted and your garments are moth-eaten.  Your gold and silver have corroded, and their corrosion will be evidence against you and will eat your flesh like fire. You have laid up treasure in the last days.” [Vs. 1-3]

In this world where the lives of politicians and the rich and famous are celebrated, it can be hard to not envy their life styles and attitudes, but this warning from God is meant to remind you that their moment is fleeting and futile; it will vanish and wither life a puff of steam on a hot summer day.  Their eternity has been set and their punishment is certain, but the sad part about that is they don’t even care.

Their lack of concern over their sinful lives is then the best evidence and justification for God’s punishment. They have lived on the earth in luxury and in self-indulgence (without a care in the world for their eternity).  They have fattened their hearts for the day of judgment and slaughter.

But God sees and God will act.  He sees His little ones being cheated and neglected.  He sees those who may have the ability to fight back simply rest and wait for the purposes and vengeance of God, and God pronounces us blessed.  We are blessed because…

We are waiting for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ who will make all things new and right.

Listen to the example James gives starting in verse 7: “See how the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient about it, until it receives the early and the late rains.  You also, be patient. Establish your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is at hand.”

I remember when I was a boy growing up in Wisconsin the anticipation we developed for the sweet corn harvest.  I want to tell you right now that some of the best corn you will ever eat comes from my home town of Pewaukee.  For a period of about 3 weeks, I would have, if I could have, eaten corn every day and in every way.  I loved it boiled, baked, and grilled, but I especially loved it fresh and raw, right off of the stalk.  My friends and I every summer went on wonderful walks through out the country side through forests and farmers fields, and for someone who loves raw corn, walking in early summer when the corn is only the size of your hand being patient and waiting can be very difficult.  Many of my friends just could not wait, so they plucked the baby corn and ate it any how, but not me.  You see I knew that if I just waited another month or so, that sweet delicacy would finally arrive and I would then eat my fill!

So we wait, but remember, we are to wait patiently and anticipate the joy that will be realized when Christ finally comes again.  And because we are waiting for our Savior and Lord, we will wait in a way that will also help others wait.  So… “Do not grumble against one another, brothers, so that you may not be judged; behold, the Judge is standing at the door.” [V. 9]  In other words, don’t take your frustration or your lack of patience out on other Christian folks, because they’re waiting just like you, and like you, they too are struggling to have patience, the patience which comes from God, as a Father gives gifts to His children.

In God’s Word, He has lavishly given to us wonderful examples of saints who have gone before us who were able to persevere in the toughest of trials.  Look at the lives of the prophets who spoke God’s Word and in His name.  Don’t we consider those great men and women of God blessed because through their lives and patience God was able to not only speak through them in their time, but still speaks in the Word preserved in our time?  And what of Job, that great champion of God, who through God’s gift of faith and patience, was able to not only persevere but latter speak great Words about the resurrection and Paradise that still give us hope.  Listen: “Oh that my words were written!  Oh that they were inscribed in a book!  Oh that with an iron pen and lead they were engraved in the rock forever!” [Job 19:23, 24]

Let me just interject and say to Job, “Dear brother they were written down in a book that bares your name.  But the words are not only yours, but the Living Word of God, Jesus Christ!  A Word that not only is written in the rock, but is the Rock of our Salvation!  But go ahead Job and preach on…

“For I know that my Redeemer lives, and at the last He will stand upon the earth.  And (long) after my skin has been thus destroyed, yet in my flesh… I shall see God… Whom I shall see for myself, and my eyes shall behold, and not another.  (And oh) My heart faints within me!” [Job 19:25-27]

These Words are for you dear baptized.  They are meant to give you strength and patience as you hold on to the cross of our dear Savior Jesus.  They are meant to give you joy in the midst of tribulation as you wait for that great and final day, which is the resurrection of the body.

The ancient church has always found encouragement in the truth of scripture, which clearly proves that God’s ways are not only different from man’s ways, but in fact they are far superior. Where the world scoffs at pain and suffering, the church knows that these things will inevitably come to one who gathers at the cross of Jesus.  But the cross of Jesus is what the world calls dead and foolish.  The world will show you the evidence of an opulent and materialistic life, and they declare that is real life.

Martin Luther said that each of us are called to look at two different kinds of wood, one that the world says is living and one that the world calls dead.  But he says, “From the living wood (the tree of knowledge of good and evil) came sin and death; from the dead wood (which is the cross of Jesus, comes)  righteousness and life.”  And so Luther warns us, “Do not eat from that living tree, or you will die, but eat of this dead tree; otherwise, you will remain in death.  That is, do not hunger for the things of this world, but for the things that find their source in heaven.

You who are baptized have a new spirit; one that truly wants to eat and enjoy [the fruit] of a tree, so that you will live in God’s Paradise. Let me turn your hearts then, to a tree that is so full of fruit that it could feed all of creation for eternity. But be warned, just as it was difficult for our first parents Adam and Eve to stay away from that living tree, so it is difficult for us to enjoy eating the fruit from the dead tree. This is because the tree in Paradise that was forbidden, was the very image of life, delight, and goodness, while the fruit from the other tree, the cross of Christ is the image of death, suffering, and sorrow.  To the eyes of sinners, one tree is living, the other is as good as dead. Within each of our hearts there is a natural desire to follow the way of glory now, in this life; that is within this life of those who must die, and then there is a natural fear to run from death where we are promised from God the only sure and certain source of life.  This tension between death and life can only be resolved when we take up our cross and follow Jesus.

Taking up the cross is by nature something that causes pain. We do not choose the cross, but it has chosen us. All we are asked to do is agree with God that there is a need for this tree, and then we are to take up the cross, and by faith follow Jesus and live.  We must agree with God that there is a need to be conformed to the image of the Son of God, which was given to us within our baptism. [Romans 8:29]  We must in the Word of God, hear the Holy Spirit speak to our hearts, and by faith believe that “All who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus can expect and will experience pain and suffering.” [II Timothy 3:12]  We will come to believe that “In the world we will have tribulation.” [John 16:33]. We will know sorrow and weeping in times when the the world will rejoice,” [John 16:20]  But we preach teach, confess, and believe that “If we share in [Christ’s] sufferings we shall also be glorified with him.” [Romans 8:17]  And so we know that “if we are left without discipline, which all experience, then we would be illegitimate children and not sons.” [Hebrews 12:8]

But we who are baptized, have learned by God’s hand to hunger for the fruit of the cross, because we know that the touch of Christ’s hand sanctifies all of our sufferings and sorrows and replaces them with the joy of anticipated future glory. We know that if we run from suffering, then we are siding with the unbelieving world, and turning from our Savior who has given both the gift of salvation and the privilege of sharing in his own passion.

Sadly for those who are perishing, those who do not wish to follow Jesus and bear the cross which God places upon him, there is no future for eternal glory and a return to Paradise.  God will not force them to follow—they are always free to deny Christ. But in so doing they have chosen to forsake the eternal fruit of His cross and will never know the joy of fellowship with Christ.

So hold on dear saints.  What we experience now in our time is no better or worse than the saints who went before us.  The promise that sustained them then is the very same promise that sustains us today.  Even in times where it seems impossible for us to wait for Christ, still we must wait.  Even when there seems to be no supply of patience, still we are ever reminded of God’s baptismal promise that He will never leave us nor forsake us.  It is in the Word of promise that we find both forgiveness of sins and the strength to hold on and wait.  In the washing of the water and the Word we are promised that though weeping may come to us in the dark times of evening, joy will be ours in the morning, and so we wait.  We wait with the church that has always patiently waited in anticipation, when Christ will come again and usher each of us into His kingdom of power and glory, forever and ever… AMEN!